Hamilton House gardens and peony collection

The Hamilton House owes its name to Richard Hamilton, who worked on the land of Charles David Tylee, owner of the Fairfield House. It was Tylee who, in March 1896, encouraged him to purchase the Rosemère Grange, built in 1793.

Richard and Helen Hamilton had six children who went to school in Sainte-Thérèse, on foot during the warmer seasons and by horse-drawn sleigh in winter.

Richard died in 1950, at the age of eighty-five, after having been quite active in the Sainte-Thérèse United Church community. His son then took over the Rosemère Grange, which was then sold at his death.

Acquired in December 2002 by the Town of Rosemère, the Hamilton House became, in late 2004, the Rosemère Cultural Centre.

In 2009, at the request of a citizen concerned with the protection and development of our green and built heritage, the Town launched a major revitalization project on the site of the Hamilton House. Converted into a cultural centre offering Rosemerites and visitors with an artistic program of great quality, the Hamilton House, through the concern for the heritage interest it represents, helps awaken everyone’s interest in art and culture, and provides artists from Rosemère and neighbouring areas, with an outstanding site where they can develop their talent.

The site has undergone a major transformation, becoming a magnificent, multi-faceted garden. The garden’s general concept refers to culture with the overall shape of the landscaping reminiscent of a guitar. A number of themes are addressed: the rock garden, the fern garden (wooded shady garden), the gazebo, the fragrance trail, and the children’ garden. Constantly evolving, since 2013, the garden has had a collection of peonies, which add to this outstanding site and which visitors can admire. The Hamilton gardens have thus become a favourite with connoisseurs and strollers alike.






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