Rosemère Former Golf Course Dossier

On this page, you will find all the information on the Rosemère former golf course dossier resulting from the vast public consultation session held from 2018 to 2020.

The frequently asked questions are found at the bottom of this page. Periodically other questions and answers will be added to this FAQ. 


Timeline

See the timeline of events and next steps in the dossier.

(2014) The Rosemère Golf Club is facing financial problems and is approaching the Town to allow, through a zoning change, the development of a parcel of land along Labelle Boulevard in order to generate the necessary funds for its sustainability.


2015 (Summer)
Zoning change allowing residential and commercial land use (maximum 4 storeys) for a parcel of land along Labelle Boulevard. The Town granted the request at a time when the request coincided with the obligation imposed by the CMM to conform our urban planning by-laws to the PMAD (Plan métropolitain d'aménagement et de développement) and the MRC's SAD (Schéma d'Aménagement d'Ensemble) with respect to the densification of the territory. A maximum of 4 storeys is authorized.

 

2016 (Spring)
The golf club is trying to sell the parcel of land to real estate developers, however the revenues generated by the development of a 4-storey project prove to be insufficient. As a result, the golf course owners requested a zoning change that would allow six-storey buildings to be built on the golf course.



2016 (Fall)
Vast public consultations on the golf course owners' request for a zoning change. Residents rejected the idea of allowing 6-storey buildings at the risk of seeing the golf course cease operations. The Town officially announced that it was rejecting the rezoning request.



2016 (Fall)
The Town reaches out to the golf club to try to find alternative solutions, but the golf club decides to put the entire 60-hectare site up for sale. 



2017 (Fall)
Mayor Westram and his team are elected and position themselves that the Town will have to develop a new urban planning vision, that as much green space as possible must be preserved and that no zoning changes will be made without citizen approval.



2018 (Spring)
PHASE 1 VISION - A TOWN PROUD, GREEN AND PROSPEROUS!

Beginning of the vast public consultation on the urbanistic vision for Rosemère in which the former golf course dossier occupies an important place - Survey - Public consultations - Focus groups - Consultation report (See download section)


2018 (Fall)
The notarised sale at a cost of $18M of the golf course to the Vachon Varin group.



2019 (Winter-Spring)
PHASE 2 ORIENTATIONS AND OBJECTIVES

Public consultations - Focus groups - Survey - Meetings of the parties concerned - Consultation report (See download section)


2020 (Winter)
PHASE 3: DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS AND POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS

Public consultations - Focus groups - Meetings of the parties concerned - Participant's Workbook distributed to all Rosemère residences (See download section). 


2020 (Spring)  The consultation report is made public and at the same time Town Council unveils its position paper. (See download section)


2020 (Summer)  In accordance with Council's position as set out in the June 2020 document, the Town is commissioning an independent study of the ecological potential of the Rosemère area. An initial opinion from the firm Nature Action identifies the sector of the Grand Coteau forest as having greater ecological potential than the former golf course site.

 

2020 (Summer) The Town is conducting an independent market value study of the golf course, including a component in the event of expropriation of the entire area (See download section).


2020 (Summer) The Town asks the MRC, by resolution, to proceed with an amendment to its schéma d'aménagement, made necessary to keep in line with Rosemère's urban vision.


2020 (Fall)  The Town submits two grant applications to CMM. One, to acquire 20 hectares of the Grand Coteau forest and another, for the reforestation of 30 hectares of the former golf course site. 



2020 (Fall) The Town is tabling a draft bylaw project for preliminary consultation with property owners whose lands are subject to the PAE, namely the former golf course and Place Rosemère.


2020 (Fall)  After a few meetings, it appears that the orientations of the Town and the owners are not convergent. 

The MRC informed the Town that the amendment it wishes to make to the schéma d'aménagement is problematic. Rosemère will have to substantiate its request to the supra-local authorities (MRC, CMM and Ministry of Municipal Affairs). 

Given the two previous points. It was agreed to stop discussions with the affected property owners, to postpone the plans d’aménagements d’ensemble (PAE) bylaw and to complete the draft Official Plan for filing in the fall of 2020. 


2020 (Fall) The owners of the golf course inform the Town that due to the stalemate in the discussions, they will not give access to their land for the development of cross-country ski trails. As a result, the Town is negotiating with the Parc du Domaine Vert to provide access for its citizens.


2021 (Winter) Submission of the urban planning draft - representations to the regional authorities concerned (MRC and CMM) in order to express Rosemerites' wishes regarding the degree of densification of the former golf course. Rosemère residents would like to see densification lower than the standards stipulated by the CMM and a mix of uses at Place Rosemère (See download section).

The municipal council intends to bring the land of the former golf course in compliance with the bylaw of an overall development plan (ODP). As a result, any project on the site will need to be submitted to the residents for approval. The municipal council wishes to reassure the population that it will continue to encourage citizen participation by Rosemerites in matters concerning the site of the former golf course beyond the approval of the new Master Plan.


2021 (Winter) On March 10, 2021, the owners of the former Rosemère golf course submitted a development project to the Town. Mayor Westram's first reaction: "[since the project] doesn’t comply with the minimum guidelines set out by our residents within the urban planning vision, this project will never see the light of day as long as I am Mayor of this Town”.

Read the full statement here: https://bit.ly/30R6uXO


2021 (Winter) Public information meeting on March 24, concerning the next steps towards official adoption of the Urban Plan document.


To view the full recording of the meeting, including all presentations and the question period: 

To view each presentation separately:
  1. Participatory approach: https://vimeo.com/533628057
  2. Legal and regulatory issues: https://vimeo.com/531873557
  3. Value at expropriation of the former golf course: https://vimeo.com/531873800
  4. Fiscal impacts: https://vimeo.com/531874033



1. What public consultations were held on the urban planning vision?

A rigorous process, unprecedented in Rosemère, involving three major phases of public consultations took place from 2018 to today.

Phase 1 March to June 2018/Vision statement: public consultations on Rosemère's urbanistic vision – five (5) activities; 608 participants

Phase 2 February to June 2019/Orientations and objectives: public consultations on development orientations – five (5) activities involving 140 participants, in addition to a survey on municipal infrastructures and facilities involving 513 respondents. Phase 2 concluded with six (6) activities involving 653 participants.

Phase 3 October 2019 to February 2020/Development concepts and solutions: public consultations on the development concept of the urban plan – five (5) activities involving 411 participants

A total of 1672 resident participants involved in the urbanistic vision process


2. What communication efforts were adopted to invite residents to participate in the consultations?

Rosemerites were invited to participate in large numbers in the various public consultation activities during the three phases. For each phase of the public consultations, an integrated communication approach was used to reach as many residents as possible. Here are the means of communication used during the three phases to solicit the community's participation and to inform them about the participatory process:

Phase 1

  • Periodic invitations in the Publ-e-mail and on the Town's website
  • Many publications in social and traditional media (local newspapers)
  • Invitation card distributed to all homes along with the Rosemère News
  • Indoor (municipal buildings) and outdoor public signage (4x8 signs at the entrances to the Town)
  • Press releases/media relations

Phase 2

  • Periodic invitations in the Publ-e-mail and on the Town's website
  • Many publications in social and traditional media (local newspapers)
  • Participant's workbook
  • Indoor (municipal buildings) and outdoor public signage (4x8 signs at the entrances to the Town)
  • Press releases/media relations
  • Satisfaction survey on public consultation activities

Phase 3

  • Participant's workbook distributed to all homes
  • Periodic invitations in the Publ-e-mail and on the Town's website
  • Many publications in social and traditional media (local newspapers)
  • Geo-referenced advertisements
  • Indoor (municipal buildings) and outdoor public signage (4x8 signs at the entrances to the Town)
  • Press releases/media relations
  • Satisfaction survey on public consultation activities


3. Will Rosemerites be consulted on the possibility of developing the former golf course site or not?

They will be consulted when a developer submits a project that meets the criteria defined in the urban planning bylaws. In addition, residents in the areas adjacent to the former golf course will then be able to demand a referendum if they are opposed to the project.


4. Does the Town intend to hold a referendum open to all residents on any proposed development of the land?

In terms of urban planning and development, no. However, a public consultation will be held for all residents, but the referendum would be only for those residents living in the areas adjacent to the former golf course.

On the other hand, if the Town were to make an investment to acquire all or part of the golf course grounds, it would have to adopt a loan bylaw that would be subject to a registry that could lead to a referendum open to the entire population.


5. Could the developer refuse public consultation to all residents?

No. It is the Town's prerogative to consult its residents in such a case. In addition, the Act requires public consultation for any zoning change.


6. Do you have the results of the votes held during the public consultations?

All the results of the workshops and tables have been compiled and analyzed.


7. Who drafted the questions asked during the public consultations?

It was a collaborative effort between the Provencher_Roy firm and the Town of Rosemère, based on the reports of the public consultations in Phases 1, 2 and 3. In short, the various public consultation activities held since 2018 have been guided by the comments received from residents throughout the process.


8. Will there be public consultations prior to the adoption of the urban plan?

In accordance with the Act respecting land use planning and development, a public consultation will be held prior to the adoption of the urban plan (which is called a “planning program” in the Act) and its bylaws.


9. Why have you not held any consultations on the future of the former golf course?

The consultation activities carried out to date have focused on the future of the entire Town, and not on any sector in particular. The process of developing an urban plan is a comprehensive reflection and it was necessary for residents to express their opinions on the entire content of the plan in order to make it a collective reflection process.

Given the residents' concerns over the dossiers regarding the former golf course and Place Rosemère and the fact that these properties will be transformed in the coming years, a number of consultations focused on these properties as well. Some processes have focused specifically on these two sites (regional hub) to address the issues in a more specific way, but always with a view to placing them in a broader context.

It is important to note that Town Council, in its urbanistic vision, will subject the former golf course site to compliance with a bylaw on the comprehensive development program. Any project that complies with this comprehensive development program will then be submitted to residents for their approval. Town Council wishes to reassure residents that it will continue to encourage their participation in the former golf course site dossier beyond the approval of the new urban plan.

In other words, the public consultation on the future of the former golf course site will take place once there is a project that is potentially acceptable to the residents.


10. What is the basis for Town Council's position to protect a minimum of 50% green space on the former golf course?

This decision is based on a position taken by Town Council following the three phases of public consultations and its 16 resident participation activities. This balanced position aims to make a minimum of 50% of the former golf course site a park that is accessible to all residents. The park will include areas for the conservation of natural environments as well as buffer zones with the existing built environment.

The Town will conduct an analysis of the existing environmental potential of the site. The area identified by this study will be designated as a green conservation zone. In order to protect this zone, an ecological, educational and light recreational park of at least equal size will complement it. In addition, the sum of these two areas will have to reach a threshold of 50% of the area, or 30 hectares. This will be integrated into the next urban plan and will be an integral part of the bylaw on the comprehensive development program.


11. Did the “50% minimum green space protection” really stem from the public consultations?

Based on the findings of the public consultations, residents were divided on the percentage to be preserved and developed. The Town recognized this and took a stand on the environmental, social and economic aspects of this issue. This is an optimal, balanced and responsible position that integrates the three components of sustainable development and respects the rights of the stakeholders (owners and residents).

Given the framework chosen for the advancement of the dossier, the main issue will be the social acceptability of a potential project; in this regard, the Town's position is clear: the final decision will be made by the residents.

1. Can the former golf course be developed at the present time?

Yes. A zone along Labelle Boulevard (H-155, H-156 + C-157, C-154) near Bourbonnière Street authorizes 2 to 4 storeys and residential and proximity commercial establishment uses.

This zone accounts for seven (7) hectares / 60hectares of the former golf course (11.5% of the golf course is developable by right).


2. What does the preliminary draft of the urban plan say about the former golf course site?

The preliminary draft proposes two dominant uses: a conservation area and a residential one. The objective is to have a minimum of 50% of the former golf course dedicated to ecological, educational and light recreational uses and to make it accessible to the public.

The remainder of the site could be developed to accommodate a project that would be subject to the comprehensive development program criteria and a specific resident approval process. The comprehensive development program will set out the conditions to be met by any project and the project will be subject to residents' approval.

In summary, the draft urban plan provides that the residents will have the final say on the former golf course dossier.


3. Is a zoning change required to build on the former golf course?

Yes, with the exception of the zones along Labelle Boulevard, which already allow residential and commercial uses. As it may be recalled, any zoning change is subject to residents' approval.


4. What are the other possible zoning options?

The zoning bylaw will have to comply with the dominant and complementary uses proposed in the preliminary draft of the urban plan, but may be more stringent than this draft, however. The dominant uses are housing and a conservation area. Nevertheless, to complete them, the complementary uses permitted (in smaller proportions) would be commercial and service (support) uses, institutional or community facilities as well as recreational uses.


5. What are the Town’s population projections?

According to Statistics Canada's 2016 data and that of the Institut de la statistique du Québec, Rosemère is currently experiencing a slight slowdown in population growth and an increase in the aging of its population.

Overall, there is a tendency towards stability in terms of demographics, although projections suggest that this slowdown will continue slightly until 2026 and increase thereafter until 2036.

It is also important to be aware of the limitations of this data, which does not take into account the territorial, social and economic reality of the region's municipalities.


6. Rosemère's population seems to be declining. What are your sources? According to Statistics Canada, the 2016 census indicates a population of 13,958 and in 2021 the MAMH is confirming a population of 14,219.

It is important to keep the same source of reference for analysis purposes. If we look at the Statistics Canada data, we see a decrease in Rosemère's population. The same is true if we take the data from the Institut de la statistique du Québec; its analysis over time shows a decline in Rosemère's population.

It is therefore the same trend; however, it is difficult to understand why the two sources have different data.


7. Would there be noise issues with a development project?

As long as the preliminary draft of the urban plan proposes low density near existing neighbourhoods, there are no noise issues to be noted.

As for the former golf course site, the Town's comprehensive development program criteria will require a noise impact study to be carried out as a prerequisite to the submission of the project so that residents can make an informed decision.


8. Has the Town made an assessment of the traffic issues associated with future projects?

In the case of the former golf course site, since the number of residents in a potential development project is unknown, the traffic volumes generated by the development are also unknown. However, the Town will require a traffic and impact study as part of the comprehensive development program criteria as a prerequisite to submission of the project.

It should also be noted that the mobility study commissioned by the Town covered the entire territory and more specifically the problem of traffic congestion along Grande-Côte Road.


9. Has the Town made an assessment of parking issues related to future projects?

In the case of the former golf course site, the comprehensive development program criteria will include stringent parking requirements to reduce the impact on the environment.

In general, the objective is not to reduce access to parking, but rather to cut down on its adverse effects and optimize its use.


10. Has the Town made an assessment of the school-related impacts?

This is the responsibility of the Centre de services scolaire, which has identified needs for a regional high school, and not just for Rosemère. That being said, the former golf course site could prove desirable to the Centre de services scolaire.


11. How many new residents are estimated in the new development?

What is important to remember is that there is a desire to preserve the continuity of the built environment with the adjacent areas as well as the rural aspects of Rosemère.

On the other hand, we could see a higher density of development at the Place Rosemère site where redevelopment is necessary.


12. Has the Town made an analysis of the environmental impacts of development?

The developer provided an environmental study of the former golf course site; however, the Town has commissioned a second opinion and a study is under way to characterize the flora and fauna on the site. The purpose of the study is to identify the ecological potential of the site and the areas of high ecological value that should be preserved.

The area established by this study will be designated as a green conservation zone. In order to protect this area, an ecological, educational and light recreational park of at least equal size will complement it. In addition, the sum of these two areas will have to reach a threshold of 50% of the area of the sector, or 30 hectares. All this will be integrated into the next urban plan and will be part of the bylaw on the comprehensive development program.

One of the criteria for the comprehensive development program will require a tree conservation and urban forestry plan.


13. Would there be financial and social impacts on residents near the site?

There is no question that the future of the former golf course site will have financial, social and environmental impacts on the Rosemère community. The objective is for these impacts to be positive and it will be up to the residents to decide, when the time comes, on the social acceptability of such impacts.


14. The water filtration and treatment plants seem to have the capacity required to support "new construction" in Rosemère. Should we therefore presume that a study or at least an assessment has been made before making these statements?

In fact, as part of the decision to invest in the sustainability of our infrastructure, the Town commissioned various studies on drinking water, wastewater, urban drainage and road network services. These studies focused on both future needs planning and asset maintenance planning. Based on the findings of these studies, the drinking water and wastewater plants do have the capacity to meet the Town's future needs.

The water transport system, however, may require reinforcement in terms of pipelines.

It is important to note the Town’s policy whereby the infrastructure requirements of a project are the responsibility of that project and not that of the residents as a whole.


15. What is the proportion of green and recreational space in the Town?

According to a study assessing present and future park and green space needs that was carried out in 2019, the Town of Rosemère's park ratio is 20% higher than the recommended standard. 70% of households have access to a park within less than a 5-minute walk.

The preliminary draft of the urban plan provides that 9% of Rosemère's territory has a park and community use, while another 9% is protected by a conservation designation.

90% of people expressed overall satisfaction with parks, sports facilities and green spaces in a survey (available on our website) that was conducted in 2019.


16. What are the Town's intentions with regard to biodiversity preservation?

In the preliminary draft of the urban plan, one of the orientations is to ensure the connectivity of green spaces through an ecological network. The objective is to maintain naturalized spaces between protected natural environments or environments of ecological interest in order to prevent the fragmentation of plant and animal habitats.

It is in this context that the Town acquired part of the Grand Coteau forest and is continuing its efforts in this regard, as it gives priority to the protection of natural environments with high ecological value.


17. Will all the trees be protected?

The Town's urban forestry plan will ensure sustainability in this regard.


18. Has an analysis been carried out on the impact on air quality?

No, not yet. When an acceptable project is submitted, this issue may be addressed.


19. Will the development of a portion of the land have an impact on flooding?

The Town will ensure that the "developable" portion incorporates exemplary stormwater management measures.


20. What is the impact on future generations if this green space is developed?

With regard to development, residents will be asked to comment on the acceptability of the proposed project that will aim to meet the needs of seniors and young families, while ensuring added value to the community and adjacent areas.

With regard to the environment, residents will be asked to vote on the acceptability of a potential project that will aim to provide the Town with a natural space of high ecological value that will be designated as a green conservation zone.

This zone will be protected and surrounded by an ecological, educational and light recreational park of at least equal size. And all of it will cover a minimum of 30hectares and 50% of the area of the former golf course.

With regard to economic concerns, the residents will be asked to express their opinion on the economic acceptability—and its impact on the municipal tax system—of a potential project stemming from the development and environmental objectives.


21. How much of the land will be protected?

The environmental study of the site will identify all existing natural areas of interest. They will be fully protected and surrounded by an ecological, educational and light recreational park. The minimum of 50% or 30hectares will not be fragmented on the grounds, but rather will be uniform instead. It will bring together all the natural environments to be protected.


22. What density will be permitted on the site of the former golf course?

The minimum density threshold established by the supra-local authorities (RCM and CMM) is 27 housing units per hectare for the Town of Rosemère. In the preliminary draft of the urban plan, a density of 21-40 housing units per hectare is anticipated for the former golf course site. The Town’s objective is to obtain a favourable opinion from the supra-local authorities in order to require a higher density at the Place Rosemère site and along Labelle Boulevard, in return for allowing a much lower density on the eastern part of the former golf course site.

As it may be recalled, residents will have to vote on any potential project on the site of the former golf course and nothing can be done without their prior consent.


23. What types of buildings are planned?

We are looking for a project that fits in harmoniously and contributes positively to Rosemère's urban landscape in terms of the layout of the buildings, the volumes, the materials and the architectural style.

The preliminary draft of the urban plan doesn’t define the typologies in a precise manner, but it does mention the objective of meeting the needs of young families and the elderly. These will be set out in the bylaw on the comprehensive development program, but it will be up to the residents to approve or reject any potential project that is submitted.


24. You say that young families don't have access to property in Rosemère. What are your sources for validating this information?

This perception comes from the fact that the price of houses in Rosemère is the highest of all in our RCM. Real estate brokers have noted that this situation makes it difficult for young, average-income families to buy a home in Rosemère. The market makes them more attracted to neighbouring towns, where houses are less expensive and newer.


25. How many storeys will be allowed?

Along Labelle Boulevard, it is already allowed to have more than one storey built. For the rest of the site, it is expected that the number of storeys will allow for continuity of the built environment and will fit harmoniously into its surroundings. The comprehensive development program will therefore guide the admissibility of a potential project, but it will always be up to the residents to accept or refuse it.


26. Which main arteries will link up with the project?

The Town will not allow through traffic on streets in the surrounding residential neighbourhoods. For example, the Bouthillier Boulevard extension and Bourbonnière Street would be the access roads to the former golf course site. There would be no streets leading into the residential neighbourhoods. However, it is planned to connect the adjacent neighbourhoods with bicycle and pedestrian paths to access the eventual park, the future bicycle network along Labelle Boulevard and its commercial establishments.


27. Could new construction be built near existing homes located on the streets along the former golf course?

No. The Town would provide a significant buffer zone between existing homes and a residential project as well as density and a built-up environment that is similar to existing neighbourhoods. These are requirements that would be included in the comprehensive development program criteria. Any project to the contrary would not be acceptable.


28. Will there be residential development only on the former golf course site?

On the former golf course land, the proportions would essentially be 50% residential and 50% conservation area. However, it is proposed to add complementary uses to meet the needs of the neighbourhood: proximity commercial establishments and services, institutional and community facilities as well as recreational activities.


29. Could a school be built on these grounds?

No. The preliminary draft of the urban plan did not include this use because it doesn’t meet the community’s needs. However, the Centre des services scolaires has the authority to require it. At the present time, the school-related needs are for a high school and these needs extend beyond Rosemère territory.


30. Could a private or public seniors' residence be built on this land?

Yes, the need has been expressed by our residents and a market study has concluded that there is a strong demand for it in Rosemère.


31. Does the Town have a portrait of the existing built environment?

Yes, in the preliminary draft of the urban plan, there is a chapter on the portrait of the territory. The current built environment is described there, with information on the major construction periods, the breakdown of owners vs. tenants, the type of housing (e.g., single-family homes, apartments), average property prices and rents, new construction, etc.


32. Is there a possibility of a community garden on the former golf course site?

Absolutely. Community gardens are permitted on the entire territory as long as such a project is consistent with the conservation purpose of the site.


33. Could there be local vegetable production on the site?

Such a project could be integrated into a future overall project as long as it is not in the natural conservation zone. The residents will then have to vote on this matter.


34. Could there be a park?

Yes, it is planned to integrate the development of a central, ecological, educational and light recreational park into any future project. In addition, small neighbourhood green spaces could be included. However, no major sports facilities would be developed there, as this would conflict with the intended use of the site.


35. Are there any green spaces left to protect on the Town's territory?

Yes, procedures are under way to acquire and protect lands in the Grand-Coteau forest that have outstanding ecological value. The Town is in the process of protecting all the natural areas on its territory.


36. What role does the RCM play in the adoption of the urban plan?

The Regional County Municipality (RCM) must certify the conformity of the Town's urban plan with its own planning document: the Schéma d'aménagement et de développement (land use development plan). The urban plan cannot be in force without the RCM's certificate of conformity.

With respect to the former golf course site, the RCM’s land use development plan indicates that only the use of golf grounds is authorized on this site. Since this use no longer exists, the RCM will have to review the situation. Discussions are under way to ensure that the RCM's decision respects Rosemère's wishes in terms of land use and density.

For the Place Rosemère site, the land use designations in the RCM’s development plan must also be revised in order to authorize residential uses on this site, where currently only regional commercial establishments are allowed. This orientation is in line with the present situation of shopping centres, which must be redefined to ensure their sustainability.


37. What role does the CMM play in the adoption of the urban plan?

Since the RCM must make changes to its development plan with regard to the land use designations of the former golf course and Place Rosemère sites, the CMM will also be required to certify the conformity of our urban plan and the eventual amendment of the RCM's land use development plan, with respect to its own planning document, the Plan métropolitain d'aménagement et de développement (the metropolitan planning and development program).

It should also be noted that the Ministère des Affaires municipales has to approve all of this in order to certify conformity with the government's land development policy for the territory (referred to as OGAT: orientations gouvernementales en matière d’aménagement du territoire).

This is known as the land development policy conformity rule, where the various planning documents are all linked in order to ensure consistency.


38. Who must be legally consulted on any zoning changes?

The Act respecting land use planning and development requires at least one public consultation meeting before amending urban planning bylaws. This meeting is open to all residents of Rosemère. If the draft bylaw provides for amendments to a provision subject to referendum approval (e.g., uses and densities), each of the provisions is subject to referendum approval by eligible voters (i.e., essentially, the residents living in the areas adjacent to the area subject to the zoning amendments).

Considering that the former golf course site will be subject to a comprehensive development program, the zoning change bylaw will be submitted, as provided for by law, to the approval of the residents who are qualified to vote, i.e., the residents of the adjacent areas concerned in the draft bylaw.

However, before the proposed zoning change is submitted, public consultations will be held with all residents to ensure the social acceptability of the proposed project. It is following these consultations that the Town will decide whether to table a zoning change bylaw for the zones concerned or to put a stop to the development project submitted.


39. Are you planning to change the waterfront zoning of the land by purchasing lots, which would have the impact of not having to consult the population?

No. Regardless of the ownership of the land, the general public will be consulted when a development project that meets the criteria of the comprehensive development program bylaw is submitted.

No zoning changes on the former golf course site may be made without the approval of the residents of adjacent areas, regardless of ownership.

Even if the Town were to acquire the adjacent lots, this would not change the zoning and the adjacent areas would retain all their rights.


40. What would happen if the urban plan isn't adopted?

In such a case, the present urban plan would remain in effect. The mandate to provide Rosemère with a new urbanistic vision would not be fulfilled, thereby putting an end to three years of consultation. The process for a new urban plan would have to be resumed, sooner or later, however. A town must update its urban plan in order to adapt to the new issues at hand. For example, the present urban plan does not allow for the Place Rosemère redevelopment project.


41. Will there be a street connecting Bouthillier and Roland-Durand boulevards?

The preliminary draft of the urban plan provides that following a new study on the needs and impacts on public mobility, the advisability of a new link in the Bouthillier/Roland Durand corridor could be considered and the steps involved could be planned within a long-term perspective. It should be noted that the possible need for such a project would be to alleviate congestion on Grande Côte Road and to integrate a link there for public and active transportation to Place Rosemère. At the present time, this is a low priority and unlikely project, but it does come within the scope of a very long-term perspective.


42. Does the urban plan have to be consistent with the urban planning bylaws, the comprehensive development program, the RCM’s land use development plan and the CMM’s metropolitan planning and development program?

Yes, in order to be in effect, the urban plan must be consistent with the policy directions of the RCM, the CMM and the Ministère des Affaires municipales. The same is true for the urban planning bylaws and, in particular, the comprehensive development program, which must be consistent with the objectives set out in the urban plan and define the means for their implementation.


43. What are the next steps prior to the adoption of the urban plan?

  1. Consultation with supra-local authorities (RCM and CMM) in order to assert Rosemère's wishes and to reconcile them with regional, metropolitan and governmental policy directions
  2. Drafting of the various urban planning bylaws (notably those on zoning, subdivisions and the comprehensive development program)
  3. Adoption by Town Council of the draft urban plan and its bylaws
  4. A public consultation meeting, as provided for in the Act respecting land use planning and development
  5. Revision of the draft urban plan to take into account the comments of the public consultation meeting
  6. Adoption of the urban plan by Town Council and submission to the RCM
  7. The RCM’s assessment of the regional conformity of the Town’s urban plan
  8. To be in effect, the urban plan must have received the assessment of conformity of the RCM, the CCM and the Ministère des Affaires municipales.


44. What are the steps following the adoption of the urban plan and before its implementation?

In order to be in effect, the urban plan must have received the assessment of conformity of the RCM, the CMM and the Ministère des Affaires municipales. This can take several months, especially when the RCM's land use development plan requires an amendment.

The urban plan is implemented in accordance with the situation; there is no obligation to carry it out, but what is carried out must be in conformity with the plan.


45. Why are the contents of the urbanistic vision not in the urban plan?

The vision is translated into the urban plan and the orientations are derived from the urbanistic vision that was the subject of public consultations. The wording of the orientations and solutions has been adapted accordingly. The preliminary draft of the urban plan essentially reflects the consensus reached or perceived during the public consultations.


1. Does the Town own the land?

No, the Town has never owned the land.


2. Is the land accessible to residents?

No, it is private property. Anyone wishing to access it must obtain permission from the owner. Over the past years, the Town negotiated winter access with the owner to set up cross-country ski trails on the property for the benefit of its residents.

However, the landowner was unwilling to enter into an agreement for the 2020-2021 season, prompting the Town to negotiate an agreement with Domaine Vert Park.


3. Does the preliminary draft of the urban plan have the force of a bylaw?

No, it has not been adopted. The formal process for adoption has not begun. Only a preliminary draft of the urban plan has been submitted.


4. What is a comprehensive development program?

The bylaw on comprehensive development programs allows the municipality to subject a sector to criteria and standards that must be respected in order to ensure coherent and sustainable development that meets its land use objectives. It is a means of setting out the Town's expectations without amending the zoning bylaw.


5. What is the consultation process for any zoning change?

It must follow an adoption process stipulated in the Act respecting land use planning and development. This includes the adoption of an initial draft and a public consultation where residents can come and have their say on that first draft. Subsequently, Town Council adopts the second draft, taking the comments made into account. It should be noted that certain amendments to the zoning bylaw are subject to the approval of the eligible voters in the adjacent areas concerned, particularly when there is a change of use.  


6. Is it possible to expropriate the land for acquisition by the Town?

Yes, that is a statutory prerogative of municipalities.


7. Are there any cases where the expropriation tribunal has ruled in favour of the expropriator?

Without an exhaustive search of case law being conducted, it should be understood that the power to expropriate is an extraordinary power given to a public body. The Act therefore provides for full compensation to the expropriated party. This is why the Town of Rosemère supports the request of the Union des municipalités du Québec (UMQ) in its application to the Government of Québec to amend the Act to eliminate compensation for potential damages and profits.


8. Is it possible to exchange land with the landowner?

In principle, yes, it would be possible provided that the Town owns land of equivalent value or area for such an exchange. This is not the case, however, so therefore it’s not possible!


9. Is it possible to place a reserve on the land to prevent any and all development?

Yes, it is possible to do so, but the purpose is not to block development, but to indicate to the owner the Town's real intention to purchase the property for municipal purposes.


10. How do you arrive at the $126million valuation for expropriation?

This valuation is based on the value to the expropriated party as explained to you by the chartered appraiser, Mr. Dubé. It is based on the principles followed by the expropriation tribunal.


11. What is the market value of the land?

The market value of the land is negotiated between the parties. It is the price point balancing the will of the seller and the buyer. The law does not define it.


12. What is the difference between land use planning and land development?

Planning provides guidelines on land use; it is a planning exercise. Development is the implementation of planning; it is what is actually built on the land. The purpose of planning is to guide future development. It does not authorize or enact it.


13. Is the Town in the process of carrying out an expropriation in disguise?

No, this is not a case of expropriation in disguise. There is no legal basis for such a claim at the present time.



1. Will residents be consulted if there needs to be a loan bylaw?

When the Town passes a loan bylaw, it must be submitted for the approval of eligible voters. These are the people who own properties where a tax will be assessed to repay the loan.

In Rosemère, loan bylaws are generally taxed on all properties, so all residents would be consulted and would have the power to accept or refuse the loan.


2. Is it possible to acquire the land upon mutual agreement?

Yes, the Town has the authority to negotiate the purchase of land by mutual agreement if the owner wishes to sell the land. The price is then determined by the market value negotiated between the parties. It is important to note, however, that the present owners of the former golf course site have indicated that the land is not for sale.


3. Are there any sources of funding for the purchase of the land (federal, provincial, RCM, CMM, etc.)?

The general rule of thumb for financial assistance is that the Town must enter into an agreement with the owner. The agreement may be conditional on obtaining a grant, but the grant cannot be conditional on obtaining an agreement.

At the present time, the CMM's blue and green infrastructure program is available. The Town has obtained good grants (66%) for the acquisition of the lands of outstanding ecological value in the Grand-Coteau forest.

The Town is always on the lookout for all grant programs and it benefits greatly from them for its municipal infrastructure.


4. Can we apply for a grant under the CMM's blue and green infrastructure program?

We have applied for grants under the CMM's blue and green infrastructure program. We have obtained good grants for Charbonneau Park as well as for the acquisition of the Grand-Coteau forest.


5. What would be the impact on municipal taxes of purchasing all or part of the land?

The financial impacts are outlined in the presentation entitled Impacts fiscaux, available here: https://vimeo.com/531874033


6. What would be the impact on municipal taxes of developing all or part of the land?

The financial impacts are outlined in the presentation entitled Impacts fiscaux, available here: https://vimeo.com/531874033


7. What would be the impact on municipal taxes of maintaining all or part of the land?

The financial impacts are outlined in the presentation entitled Impacts fiscaux, available here: https://vimeo.com/531874033


8. How do you determine that the impact on each residence would be approximately $869 in additional taxation? How is the $7,686,000 divided between commercial and residential? How many homes is your calculation based on?

The $7,686,000 is allocated 55% to residential and 45% to non-residential based on the present property tax mix. $7,686,000 x 55% = $4,227,300

We then calculate the impact per $1 of assessment on the roll and multiply that by the average house (based on 2021 averaged values).

$4,227,300 / $2,170,652,964 (averaged residential assessment) x $446,167 (average averaged house value) = $869

Our calculation is not based on the number of housing units, but rather on the roll value in order to identify the impact on the average house. On the 2021 roll, there are 4883 taxable residential housing units.


9. Is the Town's real objective to generate the most tax revenue possible by developing the former golf course site?

The Town's objective is to find a balanced and responsible solution that respects:

A) The protection of the natural environment and its sustainability

B) The needs of the community within a development framework specific to Rosemère

C) The rights of the stakeholders (residents and owners of the site)

These three aspects will be imperative for any future project that may be presented to the public. It must be remembered that no project will be carried out unless it has been approved by the residents beforehand. There is no urgency to develop this site; the only important point is that residents have the final say on the future of their town.


10. Does the Town have any examples of the maintenance costs of parks in other municipalities?

Maintenance costs for some nearby parks were in fact obtained in order to give us an idea of the costs of developing a park. Costs vary greatly depending on the size of the park, its facilities and its purpose, and we have determined the relevant aspects accordingly.


11. What is the impact of residential development on property values in the Town?

At this point in time, the answer to this question is not yet known. The impact of development on property values depends on the quality of the project. A project may give rise to an increase in value or a decrease in the value of neighbouring properties.

It will be up to the residents to reach a decision in this regard at the appropriate time, once there is a concrete project on which the appropriate analyses can be carried out in order to assess it.

A town’s role is to make sure that a project brings added value to its residents.


12. For the landowner, are there any possibilities of generating own-source revenue or financing the purchase and maintenance of a park (e.g., a non-resident entrance fee)?

The question of own-source revenue for the landowner is relevant to that landowner as long as the landowner carries out an activity that complies with the zoning bylaws.

The question of financing the purchase and maintenance of a public park is premature. The Town's first objective is to identify natural areas of high ecological value and to designate them for conservation. To protect this area, a park with an ecological, educational and light recreational intent will complement it. The whole area will cover a minimum of 30hectares.

Once the area has been determined, we intend to consult the residents in order to more precisely establish the intent and developments to be planned for this park.

At the end of this exercise, we will have defined the project and its cost, and we will then be able to decide on the funding scenarios for operating the site.






What’s happening

  • Former Golf Course Dossier
  • Back-to-the-Earth Day | Compost distribution
  • New registration platform with Voilà! Rosemère
  • COVID-19
  • Banning Plastic Bags